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01 Aug 2014

Rolling Stone interviews Hayley

Rolling Stone’s Simon Vozick-Levinson interviewed Hayley about tour, Game of Thrones and other things. You can read the full interview below, the interview is also featured in the newest issue of the magazine. Below also a new photo of Hayley taken by Lindsey Byrnes.

Four years ago, when Paramore lost founding members Zac and Josh Farro in a bitter public split, singer Hayley Williams was sure the band was over. “I thought, ‘Well, maybe it’s like the end of Stand by Me,'” says Williams, 25. “Not everything lasts forever. I’ll find something else that I’m good at.” Instead, the group went on to make last year’s Paramore as a trio – and scored one of this year’s biggest rock hits with the sharp, hooky single “Ain’t It Fun.” “I absolutely feel vindicated,” Williams says. “For all the people who believed in us, we’re saying, ‘You haven’t gotten tattoos of our lyrics for nothing. We’re going to keep going.'”

Your bassist, Jeremy Davis, recently gave himself a hernia on your summer tour with Fall Out Boy. Are you concerned that you might actually be rocking too hard?
I’m starting to accept that 25 is not 16. Seven or eight years ago, we would go to Taco Bell, grab a bean burrito and run onstage. Now, getting ready for a show takes two hours – Jeremy and Taylor [York, Paramore’s guitarist] have to wrap their ankles, and I have to do stretches so I don’t hurt my neck from headbanging. I’m loving it, but I definitely might collapse at one of these shows.

The tour is called the Monumentour, but you don’t have any monuments onstage. Which one would you pick if you did?
Oh, man. Well, I’m wearing boxing shorts and a sports bra, so maybe I’d take the Liberty Bell and be Rocky.

I saw on Twitter that you used to be a member of ‘NSync’s fan club. Is that true?
Yeah, it’s true. I’ll never forget the day that the package came in the mail. I was so pumped that I taped it to the wall, with my little card and signed poster – it probably wasn’t actually signed, but I still cared about it. Joey [Fatone] was my favorite. I thought it was hilarious that his last name spelled “fat one.”

Before Paramore, you and Jeremy were in a funk cover band. Is there any existing footage of that band performing, or has it all been destroyed?
Oh, there’s footage. We would never destroy it. I’ve asked my mom, and she doesn’t seem to have anything – I’m like, “Did you even love me?” But Jeremy’s family has it all on VHS. Our favorite song to do was “Tell Me Something Good,” by Rufus and Chaka Khan. That bass line is so sick.

I read that you’ve been watching Game of Thrones on the road. How long do you think you’d survive in Westeros?
I hope I wouldn’t survive very long, because the women in that show, God bless ’em, are living the worst life possible. The way they’re treated is sickening. I’m like, “I can’t believe I’m watching this – and I’m actually really into it.” But if I could come back as another person, I’d be Tyrion. He’s a badass.

You’ve spoken about sexism you experienced when Paramore were playing small clubs. Has that gotten better with time?
I don’t know, honestly. I’m not faced with it directly the way I was when I was 16 and we could see every single person in the crowd and hear everything they were saying. I think some of them didn’t know how to handle a girl being in a position of authority. Now, I just don’t want to hear my friends in bands saying, “I got asked again if I was a merch girl.”

What about in the wider world? Did you follow the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Hobby Lobby case that some businesses don’t have to cover birth control for their employees?
That’s a conversation that I’m having almost daily with friends, because my mom and I, and a lot of the women in my family, have had to take birth control for many more reasons besides baby-blocking. I think it’s a woman’s right. A woman’s body is her body, and her body is connected to her brain, which should be making the decisions for her body. That’s all I’ll say about that.

You’ll notice I haven’t asked you to explain your new hair color, unlike a lot of people this year.
[Laughs] I appreciate that.

What’s the dumbest hair-related question you’ve heard?
Man, if we’re going to talk about my hair, I like to talk about the reasons why, you know? For me it’s just self-expression. And it hurts a lot less than getting tattoos. I’ve got a lot of those already.

I’ve noticed that Paramore songs go over well at karaoke. Have you ever done Paramore karaoke?
I have. It was a terrible experience. I used to go to this laser-tag spot in Nashville with a big group of friends – this was right after [2007’s] “Misery Business” had gotten really popular. They thought it was hilarious to put me on the spot. Finally, I was just like, “Whatever,” and I just did it. I don’t know how this is possible, but I think I sounded worse than anyone has ever sounded singing that song. It was pitiful.

30 Jul 2014

Hayley and Chad interviewed on the red carpet at the APMAS

CM Punk and Juliet Simms interviewed Hayley and her boyfriend Chad Gilbert on the red carpet at the Alternative Press Music Awards last week. You can watch the interview below.

16 Jul 2014

Paramorefans.com interviews Paramore

Paramorefans.com interviewed Paramore in Holmdel, NJ. You can watch the interview below.

11 Jul 2014

Alternative Press scans

Our gallery has been updated with HQ scans from the newest issue of Alternative Press. The magazine includes a short interview with Hayley, new photos of Hayley and also new photo from Paramore’s photoshoot with Kane Hibberd. You can find all the scans here.

 
 

09 Jul 2014

Rolling Stone interviews Hayley

Hayley spoke with James Montgomery of Rolling Stone about the success of ‘Ain’t It Fun’ and why now is the best time to be in Paramore. You can read the full interview below.

Over the past decade, this band has experienced success, but nothing on par with what’s happened this year. Is this the best time to be in Paramore?
For sure. On every level. We keep learning what it means to be a band, both professionally and as friends in a band. It’s a constant learning process. We made a record that we were so proud of, and its success is so far beyond anything that we expected when we were writing it. So that’s incredibly satisfying, obviously, but on a personal level, I feel like our friendships are just constantly deepening, and becoming really important and vital.

“Ain’t It Fun” has become an anthem. When you first wrote it, did you have any idea it would become this massive?
We took so long making this album that we couldn’t help but be disconnected with what was going on with music at the time. It was about how we felt in the moment, what was inspiring us and what made us excited to be in a band again, and it’s so weird that those same songs are the ones that gave us the most success. Some of them are the poppiest things we’ve ever written…”Ain’t It Fun” was like word vomit; it just came out, and now everybody’s singing it, it’s on the radio, it’s really cool. I don’t know if you get that twice in your career. This is the first time we’ve experienced it, and I’m just really thankful.

So have you had a chance to actually enjoy any of this?
We all have. This year has been surprisingly calm, especially considering the song has been going wild. We did one tour at the beginning of the year, we did a cruise and now we’re on Monumentour. That’s kind of all we’ve done. We spent a lot of time at home, and it was really nice; real life is so different from the life you spend in a bus. Now I much prefer sitting on the back porch, being with family. I can tell, now more than ever, how much older I’ve gotten since we first started.

Paramore has never been bigger, yet, in a lot of ways, all of the success seems very organic. Has it been a struggle to do things on your terms?
We know when things don’t feel right. We’re all very close-knit on the road, and we are able to be honest with each other when something doesn’t feel true to the cause. Doing things like that fashion video that involved our crew guys, that keeps us enjoying every little moment, so it doesn’t become this big factory. That’s the stuff that’s important. Just like back in 2005, when we were writing back [to fans] on MySpace, if it feels real to us, then that’s how we gauge every step that we make.

Have you personally turned down offers that didn’t feel right?
In the beginning, I turned down tons of stuff; as soon as I turned 18, FHM magazine came to me. There’s been countless ridiculous things since then, and probably some cool opportunities that we just didn’t feel right about at the time. We sort of let ourselves bloom as people at the same time that we’ve let our band expand its territory. I think some of that has been in us, to know what feels right, a sense of what Paramore really is, but some of it, you grow into it. I’m not so sensitive about going out and doing certain things by myself these days, and the guys aren’t so sensitive about it either. And there’s something like the Teen Choice Awards, where we would have been like, “Oh, we don’t want to do a teen show” when we were actual teenagers and it probably would have made more sense. [Laughs]

In the past, you’ve been wary of being the focal point of the band. Is that still an issue?
You know, it depends. [Sometimes] we do TV spots, interviews, and we spend tons of time talking and you think that it feels very evenly spread out, you think that it feels deep and the questions are nice, and then it gets edited and then it’s just you, and it’s just asking about your hair. That’s the stuff that I get uncomfortable with.

There was a recent Nightline interview that certainly made mention of your hair…
Oh, well, that’s kind of what I’m referring to.

At the same time, you did “Stay the Night” with Zedd, and it went platinum. So what’s next, another Paramore album, or more solo stuff from you?
We want to make another record. Taylor’s writing all the time, and Jeremy writes quite a lot, too. I’m in that phase where I spend a lot of time journaling, and it’s usually a month or two of that before I start liking what I’m writing. It happens every album. So I think an album will happen as soon as we start writing things together that we’re like, “Yes, this feels awesome.” We’ve never finished a song we don’t like, so we have started songs, then been like, “You know what? Nah.” So we’re just waiting for that one to click, and then it will be really on. But the wheels are already turning.

As far as the little solo appearance things, I always judge based on how I feel about something in my gut. If a song like “Stay the Night” comes to me, it’s undeniable, but it has to feel right.

You’ve been fronting this band for a decade now. Has the job gotten easier or more difficult?
I’m still surprised when I feel uncomfortable with it after 10 years. It’s funny when I feel left out, or in the cold, and everyone’s focusing on me. Onstage, it’s so much about the music that I feel comfortable. But being the frontwoman is not an easy job, it’s something I’m really proud to be getting better at; performing really well, singing really well and speaking to the crowd – that’s the part I’m most nervous about, like “What do I say that makes me sound cool?” – but also trying to keep it the same way that it felt when we were in clubs. I want to connect, and so do Taylor and Jeremy. That’s our mission every night.

02 Jul 2014

Entertainment Weekly interviews Hayley

Entertainment Weekly’s Kyle Anderson interviewed Hayley and the interview is featured in the magazines newest issue. They talked about Monumentour, Ain’t It Fun, Warped Tour, Parahoy! and other things. You can read the interview below.

You just kicked off your summer Monumentour with Fall Out Boy. What have you learned about them?
Those guys work out every day, and we’re just in our dressing room eating chips. I told [FOB frontman] Patrick [Stump], “Thanks for making us all feel like the laziest buttholes.” He was like, “If I wasn’t doing this I wouldn’t be able to move on stage.” So maybe I’ll start up Ballet Beautiful in a minute.

Is that why you’ve been wearing Paramore-logo kickboxing shorts at shows?
They are the most comfortable thing I’ve ever worn on stage. I’m so happy to not be wearing latex on this tour. I look like a fitness instructor, and I love it.

“Ain’t It Fun” is the biggest hit of your career so far, and the video for it shows the band breaking world records. Were there any you tried but couldn’t do?
Believe it or not, we actually legitimately broke every record we hoped to that day. We had a list. My favorite one was smashing the alarm clocks with the guitars, because I didn’t think I was going to be able to look that badass. I was surprised how quickly those clocks exploded. On the first hit they would just burst into tiny little shards.

Now “Ain’t It Fun” is your regular closer at concerts. How does that feel?
Our show is so built around crowd participation, and it’s one of those songs that’s just got those moments really built into it. Even people who don’t know who Paramore is, they know that bridge with the gospel choir, so let’s go out with the biggest bang we can. It’s a real rock & roll ending.

You spent a lot of summers on the Warped Tour. Any advice for bands about to embark on their first Warped?
Nobody owes you anything. You have to have that mindset. When we did out first Warped Tour in 2005 we didn’t get meal tickets, so we didn’t get to eat the delicious catering. We had maybe five bucks a day to eat frozen pink lemonades or hot dogs. We had to write out all our fliers because some days our band’s name wasn’t on the schedule. It’s a lot of work, and I think it’s crucial for bands to go through that stage of their life, because then when something does get handed to you – when someone does you a favor or bumps you up to a different spot that’s better or busier or bigger – then you’ll appreciate it. Earn everything.

You’re famous for your Technicolor hair. Tell me about your look now.
This is like my SLC Punk!-blue hair. I love SLC Punk! Jason Segel’s in it, how can you not? I love how it looks, [but] as soon as I get really comfortable, that’s when I’m gonna change it.

The first-ever Parahoy! cruise was in the spring. Will there be more?
It sort of surpassed anybody’s expectations. It was this little subculture where everyone knew each other and everyone knew each other’s music and sang and hung out and ate dinner and partied. I loved it. I hope we do this for the rest of our career.